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Ever wondered what happens to your eggs after they’ve been collected?

Ever wondered what happens to your eggs once they've been collected?

Ever wondered what happens to your eggs in the lab once they have been collected?

After collecting the eggs, I hand them over to a scientist from Monash IVF. They use powerful microscopes to find the eggs in the fluid from the ovaries.

It’s important the eggs are fertilised quickly. The eggs and some sperm are placed in a dish. They have the chance to find each other and fertilise like they would naturally within the body.

If the sperm fertilises the egg, it becomes an embryo. The scientists put the embryo into a special incubator where the conditions for growth and development are perfect.

The scientists keep an eye on the embryos over 5-6 days. They want to get it to a stage known as ‘blastocyst’ – this boosts the chance of a successful pregnancy.

Not all eggs will fertilise and reach embryo stage, but the team of scientists will keep both me – your specialist – and you up to date with its progress.

If your embryo develops in the lab, it’s then ready to be transferred into the uterus.

Ever wondered what happens to your eggs in the lab once they have been collected?

After collecting the eggs, I hand them over to a scientist from Monash IVF. They use powerful microscopes to find the eggs in the fluid from the ovaries.

It’s important the eggs are fertilised quickly. The eggs and some sperm are placed in a dish. They have the chance to find each other and fertilise like they would naturally within the body.

If the sperm fertilises the egg, it becomes an embryo. The scientists put the embryo into a special incubator where the conditions for growth and development are perfect.

The scientists keep an eye on the embryos over 5-6 days. They want to get it to a stage known as ‘blastocyst’ – this boosts the chance of a successful pregnancy.

Not all eggs will fertilise and reach embryo stage, but the team of scientists will keep both me – your specialist – and you up to date with its progress.

If your embryo develops in the lab, it’s then ready to be transferred into the uterus.